A Review of the Nigerian Energy Industry

New Power Minister lays down marker for improved power sector in Nigeria

*Warns operators to sit up or ship out

Oscarline Onwuemenyi

16 February 2013, Sweetcrude, Abuja – The new Minister of Power, Professor Chinedu Nebo has warned various operators in the nation’s power sector to up their game or risk losing their licenses.

Nebo, who was spoke at the launch of Power Sector Road Map Reform 2.0, said the initiative aims to review and revise the original road map developed in 2010 to produce data which are more consistent with the current and future challenges ahead.

Noting that the target of uninterrupted power supply in the country was achievable, Nebo stressed that “power delivery to this country is a task that must be accomplished and paramount to Mr. President.”

The Minister, who said he observed with grave concern the increasing frequency in system collapses of the grid charged the operatives of this segment in the TCN to be extra diligent and vigilant.

“I shall not entertain frivolous reasons for continued system collapses.  Owners of this process must sit up or be prepared to ship out,” Nebo warned.

“Another area of serious concern which is needed to be addressed is the poor track record of project delivery across the value chain and especially in the transmission segment which will remain in government hands.

“Without a major shift towards improved efficiency, it could frustrate the development of a sustainable private sector driven power market in Nigeria and it is a veritable option in order to align to the internationally acceptable business standards, thus, I will insist on this shift to happen soon,” he said.

He stressed that as the nation progresses into the threshold of handing over the sold assets to the successful bidders, the Distribution Companies must sit up during this transition period.

According to him, “Any of the officers in the Distribution Companies found to be sabotaging the revenue collection targets of the market, will be made to face the full wrath of the law.

“This is because government will not tolerate complacency and ineptitude of these companies building up additional burdens of liabilities through the misconduct of these companies,” he added.

Nebo blamed “decades of neglect and unsustained infrastructural investment and reform of the sector that brought us to where we were before the intervention of President Goodluck Jonathan.

“The power sector development is ongoing but will take time, money and more importantly the support of all Nigerians to see to the conclusion of the sector reform,” he added.

According to Nebo, the Presidential Task Force on Power (PTFP) is indeed a proven technical resource to the sector, noting that the present administration intends to fully utilize it to foster rapid development in the sector as well as tackle most of the technical challenges, especially in efficient project planning, timely project delivery, facilitating process coordination between sector entities and generally the provision of validated performance metrics for the power reform agenda.

“I recognize that this is a very technical assignment and I enjoin you all to put in your very best in order to bring out a power sector document worthy of attracting the much needed local and international acceptance as well as participation by investors,” he said.

He added that, “I have no doubt that with the commitment and dedication of all the stakeholders, the concerted effort will produce an impressive sector guiding tool.

“Let me reiterate here that, we all undertaking very serious  national assignment and I am not unaware of the complexities and the challenges which lie ahead but with our unalloyed commitment and resolve to light up the country, you will have a special place in the signs of time and history.”

The Minister urged Nigerians to appreciate the efforts of the Administration which, he noted, has so far produced tangible improvements in power supply. “The best is yet to be achieved but we are within reach,” he stated.

In this article

Join the Conversation

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.

  • In Nigeria, every new government appointee makes an effort to make his presence felt in the first few weeks and sometimes months, only to settle down to business as usual in no time at all. We hope Professor Nebo doesn’t fall into this characterisation.