Liberia: NOCAL's scholarships over half a million

johnson sirleaf

President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf of Liberia

03 February 2014, The National Oil Company of Liberia, NOCAL, says its total spending on training and education for young people all around Monrovia and its environs approaches over half a million dollars.

During the graduation exercise of 304 vocational students from the Liberia Opportunities Industrializations Center or LOIC on Friday, January 31, NOCAL Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Randolph McClain said, NOCAL’s role in the partnership with LOIC has been the provision of finance, which he said amounts more than $89,000.

Out of the total number of graduates at LOIC over the weekend, NOCAL said 53 of its sponsored students, including 6 females and 47 males successfully completed the program.

Dr. McClain said since 2012 when NOCAL joined LOIC in partnership to provide skills training for youths; the initiative has changed the lives of over 200 young people from street dwellers to being plumbers, mechanics, carpenters, and other professionals.

He disclosed that currently, NOCAL is sponsoring 185 students at LOIC. Last year, the NOCAL boss said about 1,200 students were placed on NOCAL’s scholarship for vocational training around Monrovia and its environs, out of which he said, a total of 126 students were accepted at the LOIC.

“111 were males and 15 females… they have undergone a series of vocational training- shoes making, plumbing, carpentry, electricity, auto-mechanic, tailoring, and even masonry”, Dr. McClain outlined during the occasion.

He however said 26 other students, who were on NOCAL scholarship at LOIC, are being required to stay for an additional three months.

“We remain committed to the maintenance and process of expansion of this partnership since the need to provide skills, training and other capacity building for young people remain very, very pivotal…,” he assured the students.

Also speaking, Minister Charles Gaye, representing the Ministry of Education, urged the graduates to group themselves into companies and pursue contracts from government and organizations, since indeed, he noted, the government may not be able to employee everyone.

He reminded the graduates that as they get on the job market, their attitudes stand out to be the most important thing in the industrialized world, warning them against tricking people on things they know they are unable to do.


– The New Dawn

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